Connecting in the Age of Coronavirus

On the inside looking out.

Stories are still all around us. We just have to be creative about hearing them.

As I write this, the world is sequestered. We are living small, staying in our homes, waiting for the coronavirus to blow over. As a recent transplant to Kansas City, this is a double-whammy. I was looking forward to spring when people re-appear after hibernation. I knew I would find my tribe at concerts, rallies, record stores and coffee shops. All this is on hold for now.

My wife wisely suggested that – as a way to stay connected – I call someone everyday. She has work to keep her busy and is becoming a master on Skype and Zoom. My job is my business. My business is hearing and preserving stories. As it turns out, these daily calls to loved ones are nourishing to me and, also, so it seems, the loved ones I call.

When I talk to friends and family we talk about the impact of the virus, the news, the spread of sickness. Inevitably, we also talk about our shared memories. We recount past vacations, family get-togethers and even highlights from what we did not realize would be our last face-to-face visit for awhile.

Stories by phone

My business is based on personal contact. In my work, I come to you, we discuss the scope of your storytelling, we craft questions together that elicit the stories you want to tell, then we record. This simple model doesn’t work during a shelter-in-place order, which is why I am shifting – for now- to phone based recollections. We can plan and conduct our recording of your stories by phone or a web-based call.

Let’s get the conversation started.

Maybe you have been thinking about preserving some stories. These could be yours, those of a friend or an elderly relative. I am ready to work with you (at a distance) to define the scope of stories and a strategy for preserving them.

Book a free consultation today by e-mail RecollectionAgency@yahoo.com or phone (816)514-5146.


“Dogs sniff each other. Human beings tell stories. That is is our native language.”
— Steve Denning, author, The Springboard